Children's Specialized Hospital in New Jersey

The Children's Specialized Hospital in New Jersey is the pre-eminent provider of pediatric rehabilitation in the United States, serving infants, children, adolescents and young adults. It is a non-profit organization that serves the needs of more than 17,000 children every year at eight different locations. It is well known for its high-quality treatment programs and has recently been named one of the top ten children's hospitals by New York magazine. The Children's Specialized Hospital is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities (CARF), the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO) and the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA).

The Children's Specialized Hospital offers treatment and rehabilitation programs in spinal cord dysfunction and injury (SCI), traumatic brain injury (TBI) and infant toddler treatments, including but not limited to ventilator weaning and neonatal abstinence syndrome. The Brain Injury Program, a center of excellence founded in 1981, offers both inpatient and outpatient services, including an outpatient neuro rehab program. The TBI program is designed for infants, children and young adults up to the age of 21. In addition, the program offers a number of services to the families of each patient, which helps them learn and cope with their child's injuries.

The Children's Specialized Hospital TBI program is staffed with a number of physicians who specialize in physiatry, neurology and developmental pediatrics who are striving for maximum rehabilitation of each child, including a board-certified pediatrician, occupational therapists, physical therapists, recreational therapists, speech therapists, child life specialists, psychologists, dieticians, audiologists, learning disabilities teachers, patient care coordinators and nurses. The program provides comprehensive and individually tailored inpatient rehabilitation services, as well as continued care in an outpatient setting.

In addition to a rehabilitation team, the program is staffed by a team of experts, led by Krishan Yalamanchi, MD, the Clinical Director of the Brain Injury Program at Children's Specialized Hospital. Dr. Yalamanchi is board certified in general pediatrics and neurodevelopmental pediatrics. He received his medical degree from the Jawaharlal Institute in Pondicherry, India, and completed his residency at the Newark Beth Israel Medical Center in New Jersey. He specializes in utilizing psychopharmacology — the study of effects, actions and development of psychoactive drugs — in treatment of TBI and strives to uphold the long-term follow-up care that Children's Specialized Hospital provides to each patient.

   Dr. Krishan Yalamanchi
 

The Children's Specialized Hospital TBI, SCI and Infant Toddler rehabilitation facility is a 60-bed, 125,000 square-foot hospital. It contains leading-edge therapy rooms, a pool, a gym, an outdoor therapy garden, a full kitchen and a number of playrooms. The hospital focuses on "patient-and-family centered care," a unique approach that shapes both their policies and rehabilitation programs.

The medical directors and staff at the hospital strongly believe that each child's family offers a strong support system and hope that leads to an effective rehabilitation process and greater patient satisfaction. The Children's Specialized Hospital encourages families to become a part of their child's treatment and recovery. This is why the hospital offers complimentary accommodations for at least one parent at all times. Additional family members may stay at a facility located just one block from the hospital. The hospital's ultimate goal is to rehabilitate each child in order to achieve the highest level of independence possible while focusing on treatment as a journey for the whole family.

To refer a patient with TBI to Children's Specialized Hospital, please call (888) CHILDREN. To find out more about the hospital's TBI program, please visit their website at www.childrens-specialized.org.

 

[Last revision: November 2009]

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